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Judge Rules That AI-Generated Art Exempt from Copyright

Judge underlines "human input" as vital aspect of copyright claims.

In recent years, Artificial Intelligence has undergone a series of groundbreaking advancements that have reverberated across numerous industries. Innovations like ChatGPT and the proliferation of AI-powered art generators have captivated the world, leading to a range of unprecedented situations. Notably, AI-generated artworks have even been bestowed with artistic accolades, fueling debates among both creators and enthusiasts. Presently, a fresh legal precedent has emerged, challenging the safeguarding of AI-generated creations.

Stephen Thaler’s AI-generated artwork cannot be copyrighted. Steven Thaler and/or Creativity Machine
Stephen Thaler’s AI-generated artwork cannot be copyrighted. Steven Thaler and/or Creativity Machine

In a recent ruling by United States District Court Judge Beryl Howell, it was established that artworks crafted by AI cannot be afforded copyright protection. This judgment arose within the context of the Thaler v. Perlmutter case. The core of this case revolves around Thaler's endeavor to secure copyright for an AI-produced image, a pursuit that was rejected by the United States Copyright Office. The rationale behind this refusal lay in the absence of human authorship, a point Judge Howell emphasised by asserting the significance of "human authorship" as a fundamental requirement.


However, the legal landscape surrounding AI-generated creations remains dynamic, with ongoing legal battles poised to shape the trajectory of how such undertakings are treated in the future.



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